The Art of Planning

“Don’t think about the start of the race, think about the ending” – Usain Bolt

One common question, I’m receiving from most of my friends is

How you are managing your time to do these many things?

Actually, they meant how I’m being active in learning new tools, reading books, making progress in blogging, posting random pieces of stuff at social media and all.

I took this question seriously and planned to answer them all via this blog post.

Planning is the ultimate key to unlock these activities.

 

Why planning?

A couple of years back I too had the same set of questions on how to create an action plan and how to efficiently work on it.

I have started reading some books, watching some YouTube videos, and listening to other people stories on how they are managing time on personal life as well towards their passion.

I have written all good ideas I have collected from the various medium in a notepad.

Later, I have clearly picked up the items which suit me.

On most time management & goal settings stories, I have found one common habit or ground rule.

It’s PLANNING!

 

How I have prepared my action plan?

Then, I have come up with an idea to create an action plan. I have started listing all things I wished or dreamed to complete in next few weeks or months or years.

Once I have listed all the items I wish to do. It looks like a large list, kind of watching a horror movie at midnight.

Instead of making progress in all the items at the same time, I have come up with idea of

  • prioritizing
  • categorizing

I have started to prioritize the list based on Career growth and Personal growth from most to least important. (Kind of bubble sort, decided which bubbles I need to burst first)

After prioritizing, Its time for categorizing.

In my case, I have decided to Categorize my action plan based on what time frame I have to achieve it.

So, the categories will look like this

  • Long-term
  • Short term
  • Daily
  • Today

The long-term goal is something I planned to achieve in few years. Short term goal is the items I wish to cover in minimum one year. Daily goals are like checklist I should follow on daily basis. Today board is to plan for the day ahead.

Ultimately, my planning board looks like following

planning

I shall create a separate post on how I plan for the day ahead.

I used to keep this list on my desktop screen always using sticky notes options on my windows laptop.

Basically, I’m a sticky note lover. And below is my monitor screen filled with sticky notes 🙂

sticky_notes_overused

 

Next big step

We have planned everything, whats the next big step?

Executing

Yes! A very organized plan will help you to make consistent progress to reach your goal.

 

Hope you have like this post, please follow this blog to receive more updates.

And also Please comment your thoughts or share your ideas on planning in the comment section.

 

Happy planning!

 

 

Origin of Hello World

When we start learning some programming languages or watching some tutorials, the very first code example we will come across is displaying a greeting message. Most probably message will be

“Hello World” or “Hello World!”

* ignore the case

If we can see this two words in our output, we believe that we achieve something and everything loads, or works as expected. It’s a test, signifying a start to a program. Over the past several decades, it’s grown to become a time-honored tradition. Once the Hello World is displayed in the Output window, internally in our mind we appreciate ourselves like Yeah! we did it. (beginner stage of programmer life; of course, someone still has the enthusiasm after years & years of experience).

The following is my first hello world program I have used in my attempt at learning programming like everyone else

#include <stdio.h>
main()
{
        printf("hello, world\n");
}

Where did it come from?

The tradition of using the phrase “Hello world!” as a test message was influenced by an example program in the seminal book The C Programming Language. The example program from that book prints “hello, world” (without capital letters or exclamation mark), and was inherited from a 1974 Bell Laboratories internal memorandum by Brian Kernighan, Programming in C: A Tutorial, which contains the first known version:

 main() {
        printf("hello, world");
 }

The first known instance of the usage of the words “hello” and “world” together in computer literature occurred earlier, in Kernighan’s 1972 Tutorial Introduction to the Language, with the following code:

main( ) {
  extrn a, b, c;
  putchar(a); putchar(b); putchar(c); putchar('!*n');
}
a 'hell';
b 'o, w';
c 'orld';

 

After that people started using the same greeting message in books, demos, and tutorials for lots of programming language like Java, C#, etc.

That’s it.

So, Hello World!

Happy Coding!